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The Father of Chiropractic

Posted by on Jul 18, 2012 in History | 0 comments

The Father of Chiropractic

Daniel David Palmer established the modern practice of spinal manipulation in the 19th century. He is known as the Father of Chiropractic . Palmer was born on March 7, 1845 in Pickering, Ontario, Canada, to Katherine McVay and Thomas Palmer. When he was twenty, Palmer moved with his family, to the United States where he worked as a beekeeper, farmer, school teacher, and grocery store owner. Palmer had interests in health philosophies and spiritualism.   Magnetic Healing, Palmer’s Precursor to Chiropractic In 1886, Palmer embarked on a healing practice, opening his first office in the South Putnam Building in Davenport, Iowa. He named the therapy “magnetic healing,” which is a cross between massage and meridian therapy based on the concepts of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Gaining knowledge from reading medical journals and worldwide developments in anatomy and physiology, he resolved inflammation of the nerves and created remedies.   The Nervous System Affects Health In Palmer’s first ten years of practice, he questioned MDs about the true causes of diseases, and why people have different diseases, given the same environment. He wanted to know how two people borne of the same parents, living in the same house, breathing the same air, and drinking the same water, had significant health differences, one prone to disease, while the other healthy. Palmer theorized that in addition to external factors, the function of the nervous system was an internal factor that affected a person’s health.   Palmer Cures Deafness with Spinal Manipulation On September 18, 1895, Palmer discovered his health theory about the nervous system when he met Harvey Lillard, the building janitor, who had been deaf for 17 years. Palmer noticed that Lillard had a lump in his back. When asked about the cause of his hearing impairment, Lillard revealed that when he was in a cramped stooping position while exerting himself, he felt something broke in his back. He then instantly lost his hearing. Palmer discovered in an examination, that a vertebra was not in its normal position. He theorized that the dislocated vertebra blocked the spinal nerves controlling the inner ear, and that if the vertebra was replaced, the nerve pathways will reopen. After half an hour of convincing Lillard that if the vertebra in his back was replaced, he will regain his hearing, Palmer then applied a firm pressure to Lillard’s back with his hands, using the spinous process as a lever. Soon after, Lillard regained his hearing.   Palmer Restores Heart Condition Following Lillard’s adjustment, Palmer treated a patient with a heart problem. In an examination of the patient’s spine, a dislocated vertebra was found pressing against the nerves innervating the heart. When the vertebra was replaced, the patient was relieved.  These two cases supported his theory, and Palmer rationalized his discovery, that if two different health complications were caused by impinging pressure on the nerves, then other diseases may be caused by the same condition. He then concluded that a partial dislocation of the vertebrae alters its nerve flow, thus causing 95% of all diseases; the rest is caused by dislocated joints apart from the vertebral column. Then began the science (knowledge) and art (adjusting) of Chiropractic. There was nothing ‘accidental’ about this, as it was accomplished with an object in view, and the result expected was obtained. There was nothing ‘crude’ about...

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Subluxation & Langworthy

Posted by on Jul 14, 2012 in History | 0 comments

Subluxation & Langworthy

What is a Subluxation? A subluxation is a partial dislocation, a slight misalignment of the vertebrae, regarded in chiropractic theory as the cause of many health problems. Origin late 17th. century: from modern Latin subluxatio (n-) (sub – meaning position; luxate – meaning dislocate). -New Oxford American Dictionary   Subluxation, a Term Coined by Langworthy The word subluxation was first used by the chiropractor Solon M. Langworthy to describe the misalignment that narrowed the “spinal windows” (or intervertebral foramina) and interrupted the nerve energy. He is also known for referring to the brain as the “life force.”   Langworthy, a Pioneer of Chiropractic Along with BJ Palmer (son of DD Palmer, the Father of Chiropractic), Langworthy was one of the first graduates of the Palmer School of Chiropractic, the first chiropractic school. In 1903, Langworthy pioneered his own chiropractic school, and called it the American School of Chiropratic and Nature Care (ASC & NC) in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. During that time, Dr. Heinrich Matthey, a medical doctor in Iowa, demanded that drugless healers be prevented from practicing in the state, and that education should only be entrusted to doctors of medicine. Langworthy took a different step for chiropractic. He improved classrooms, and provided a curriculum of chiropractic study. He narrowed the extent of chiropractic to the treatment of the spine and nervous system, and removed blood work from the field, leaving it to the osteopaths for specialization.   Mixers Vs. Straight Chiropractic Langworthy’s health philosophy combined chiropractic with what would become naturopathic cures and osteopathy.  Later, the chiropractors practicing this philosophy of chiropractic in conjunction with other therapies would be known as Mixers, because they mixed chiropractic with other therapies. Langworthy wanted to partner with BJ Palmer, but Palmer declined his offer, because he preferred to practice Straight chiropractic, and not mix chiropractic with other healing therapies. It should be noted that both methods of chiropractic, mixing and straight, yield favorable results. The difference is a matter of theory, and the preference from chiropractor to chiropractor is a matter of schooling and arguable opinion.   Langworthy Brought Chiropractic Into the Scientific Field Langworthy published the first book on chiropractic in 1906 called Modernized Chiropractic —Special Philosophy — A Distinct System, and thereby moved chiropractic into the scientific field. Article written by Pearl Tripoli, Writer at...

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Developing Chiropractic

Posted by on Jul 14, 2012 in History | 0 comments

Developing Chiropractic

  BJ Palmer, Son to the Founder of Modern Chiropractic Bartlett Joshua Palmer, known to the world as BJ Palmer, was born to Daniel David Palmer and Louvenia Landers McGee Palmer on September 10, 1881 in What Cheer, Iowa. When DD Palmer created his theory that a partial dislocation of the vertebrae alter its nerve flow, thus causing 95% of all diseases,   he was reluctant to share his discovery with others, including his own son, BJ. When he finally decided to share his method, he opened a school in addition to his magnetic healing infirmary. (More information about DD Palmer, Father of Chiropractic)   BJ Palmer, A Dedicated Student BJ was one of his father’s first students. As a student, BJ was serious with his studies and responsibilities. He was the first to arrive at the infirmary and the last to leave. In 1904, he was one of the first graduates of Palmer Infirmary and Chiropractic Institute.   Escaping Conviction for Practicing Without a Medical License When in 1899, a medical doctor  named Heinrich Matthey in Davenport, Iowa demanded that drugless healers be prevented from practicing in the state, and that education should be entrusted only to doctors of medicine, BJ and his father were prosecuted. While his father, DD Palmer, was convicted in 1906 for curing diseases without a license in medicine, BJ never turned up and thus did not go to jail.   Owning the Palmer School of Chiropractic After his father’s conviction, the school was forcefully sold to him. He was already president of the school since 1904. With an arbitration committee, the deal was settled for $2,196.79, and included an assortment of books and specimens from the osteological collection. The school was then named Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC), and it is still one of the most prominent chiropractic colleges in the US today.   Many Chiropractic Colleges Open Under BJ Palmer’s leadership, PSC expanded its enrollment to over a thousand students in the 1920’s. Three major buildings were constructed: Administration, DD Palmer Memorial, and BJ Palmer hall. Thirty more chiropractic schools opened in the next fifteen years. One of which was John Howard’s National School of Chiropractic, which moved to Chicago, Illinois, and is now the National University of Health Sciences. With each school venturing to establish its own identity, Palmer carried on developing his father’s concept of innate intelligence.   Palmer Advances Chiropractic Through Research Palmer improved the methods of spinal adjusting and analysis through extensive research. He included X-Ray imaging technology into the Palmer curriculum, and called it spinography. The first x-ray equipment was in full use in the classroom and patient clinics. He authored over 70 books, numerous booklets, speeches, research, and various printed material on chiropractic. With Palmer’s aggressive marketing strategies, the standards of chiropractic education increased, and so did the worldwide awareness and appreciation of chiropractic.   Legacy Passed to Dave Palmer, the Educator of Chiropractic When BJ Palmer died in 1961, the school was passed to his only son, Dr. David Daniel Palmer, more commonly known as Dave Palmer, who went to University of Pennsylvania, and then Wharton School of Business. Dave knew that he would some day take charge of the school and so he wanted to be educated in business. His grandfather was known as the father of chiropractic, his father...

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